About us
© Stefania Casellato
who I am

“I am an economist and a historian of economic thought, with growing interests in ethics, biblical studies and literature. These latter ones are side interests that have grown over the years to the point of changing the nature of my profession, which is constantly evolving. Because when I tried to get to the bottom of those 'economic' words that had fascinated me since my earliest studies - well-being, happiness, reciprocity, market, gift, gratuitousness... - I gradually realized that these 'first' words are too rich and complex to be well understood and explained by economic science alone, not even by that economy which I had helped to become more open to social and civil issues.

When they try to move from theory to life, the individual disciplines, all of them, die. In order to resurrect they must enter into dialogue with the other sister disciplines, because the verbs that open up life and explain it must be declined to the first person plural (we).

So today my work as a scholar and intellectual alternates between articles on economic theory with biblical commentaries and books on the history of economic thought as well as other writings on the religious nature of capitalism, and none of these strands alone is able to express fully what occupies my mind and heart today.”

Image
About us
© Stefania Casellato
who I am

“I am an economist and a historian of economic thought, with growing interests in ethics, biblical studies and literature. These latter ones are side interests that have grown over the years to the point of changing the nature of my profession, which is constantly evolving. Because when I tried to get to the bottom of those 'economic' words that had fascinated me since my earliest studies - well-being, happiness, reciprocity, market, gift, gratuitousness... - I gradually realized that these 'first' words are too rich and complex to be well understood and explained by economic science alone, not even by that economy which I had helped to become more open to social and civil issues.

When they try to move from theory to life, the individual disciplines, all of them, die. In order to resurrect they must enter into dialogue with the other sister disciplines, because the verbs that open up life and explain it must be declined to the first person plural (we).

So today my work as a scholar and intellectual alternates between articles on economic theory with biblical commentaries and books on the history of economic thought as well as other writings on the religious nature of capitalism, and none of these strands alone is able to express fully what occupies my mind and heart today.”

Image
Scientific Articles
1.
Special Issue: Happiness, Capabilities, and Opportunities
International Review of Economics, 2020, 67, (1), 1-3
3.
Martin Luther and the different spirits of capitalism in Europe
International Review of Economics, 2019, 66, (3), 221-231
4.
The rent disease: Achille Loria’s criticism to the capitalistic society
The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, 2019, 26, (1), 1-22
5.
Capitalism and Its New–Old Religion: a Civil Economy PerspectiveJournal for Markets and Ethics, 2018, 6, (1), 121-131
6.
The plural roots of rewards: awards and incentives in Aquinas and GenovesiThe European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, 2018, 25, (4), 637-657 View citations (3)
15.
Jeremy Aldeman: Worldly Economist: The odyssey of Albert O. HirschmanInternational Review of Economics, 2013, 60, (3), 343-348
16.
Michael Sandel: What money can’t buy: the moral limits of marketsInternational Review of Economics, 2013, 60, (1), 101-106
18.
Reclaiming Virtue Ethics for EconomicsJournal of Economic Perspectives, 2013, 27, (4), 141-64 View citations (21)
19.
IntroductionInternational Review of Economics, 2012, 59, (4), 321-333
27.
28.
Frey, B.: Happiness. A revolution in economicsJournal of Economics, 2009, 98, (2), 177-179
29.
Testing theories of reciprocity: Do motivations matter?Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 2009, 71, (2), 233-245 View citations (52)
See also Working Paper (2009)
31.
Dynamics of relational goodsInternational Review of Economics, 2008, 55, (1), 113-125 View citations (6)
32.
FRATERNITY: WHY THE MARKET NEED NOT BE A MORALLY FREE ZONE*Economics and Philosophy, 2008, 24, (1), 35-64 View citations (31)
33.
Reciprocity: theory and factsInternational Review of Economics, 2008, 55, (1), 1-11 View citations (3)
34.
Watching alone: Relational goods, television and happinessJournal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 2008, 65, (3-4), 506-528 View citations (168)
See also Working Paper (2005)
39.
Pareto’s methodological projectInternational Review of Economics, 2006, 53, (4), 423-450
40.
A Note on the «Obscure» (to Mirowski) Giovanni VailatiHistory of Economic Ideas, 2004, 12, (1), 119-121
42.
The 'Happiness transformation problem' in the Cambridge traditionThe European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, 2004, 11, (3), 433-451 View citations (6)
43.
The “Technology of Happiness†and the Tradition of Economic ScienceJournal of the History of Economic Thought, 2004, 26, (1), 19-44 View citations (8)
47.
Ego Facing Alter: How Economists have Depicted Human InteractionsAnnals of Public and Cooperative Economics, 2000, 71, (2), 285-313 View citations (4)
what am I doing
Image
Image
Image
Image